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    Cutting Edge Haunted House. Located in Ft. Worth, TX
    One of the World's Largest & Scariest Haunted Houses.

Friday13BlackSo, it’s Friday the 13th of November. Are you feeling lucky? Sure, it’s probably just mere superstition, however, paraskevidekatriaphobia, or fear of Friday the 13th, affects people the world over, leading to responses ranging from mild dread to full blown panic attack whenever the two dates shall clash.

Should you be afraid? Just because the 13th guest at the Last Supper was Judas, the disciple who betrayed Jesus, and the Code of Hammurabi omits the 13th law for fear of it’s being evil, hey, who’s to say that’s bad?

Most hotels and many high rise buildings around the world have opted to skip the 13th floor. Traditionally, doomed prisoners climbed 13 steps to the gallows. And an old superstition says that those with 13 letters in their name are doomed to a life of misery. Think Charles Manson, Jack the Ripper, Jeffrey Dahmer, Theodore Bundy and Albert De Salvo. Apollo 13 was the only moon mission which failed, with near disastrous consequences. Still feeling lucky?

On Friday, Aug. 13, 2010, a 13-year-old boy was struck by lightning at 1:13 p.m. — that’s 13:13 hundred hours, in Suffolk, England. According to Rex Clarke, a St. John Ambulance team leader, “Suddenly there was this huge crack of lightening really close to the seafront and really loud thunder. Seconds later we got a call someone had been hit. The boy was breathing and was conscious.” The boy had only a minor burn. Clarke said, “It’s all a bit strange that he was 13, and it happened at 13:13 on Friday 13.”

History is filled with tales of horrific happenings that have occurred on Friday the 13th, such as the date of two fatal plane crashes, Friday October 13, 1972. Not only did the infamous Swiss rugby team end up battling for survival in the Andes (think “Alive”), but a much larger flight crashed that same day near Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport, killing all 174 passengers and crew.

While you may be tempted to stay home and curl up in bed in order to avoid the ravages of this unlucky day, history has proven that there is no safe place when Friday the 13th rolls around. Witness an unfortunate gentleman by the name of Daz Baxter, who attempted to bury his head beneath the blankets of his bed on Friday, August 13th, 1976 to avoid any possible peril. He was killed that day when the floor of his apartment building collapsed.

So what is there to do? Why not venture out, seize the bull by the horns, look fate in the eye and laugh like a maniac! Come on down to Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth and show the world you’re not afraid of any silly old superstations! Laugh in the face of peril! Embrace the dark side! Open Friday and Saturday night for a special Friday the 13th encore performance. We’ll keep the lights out for you…

Happy Halloween from Cutting Edge

Posted on 31 Oct 2015 In: Haunted House News

Tis night for revel, set apart
To reillume the darkened heart,
And rout the hosts of Dole.
‘Tis night when Goblin, Elf, and Fay,
Come dancing in their best array
To prank and royster on the way,
And ease the troubled soul.

The ghosts of all things, past parade,
Emerging from the mist and shade
That hid them from our gaze,
And full of song and ringing mirth,
In one glad moment of rebirth,
Again they walk the ways of earth,
As in the ancient days …

—J.K. Bangs, Harper’s Weekly, Nov. 5, 1910.

Merry Samhein!

It’s not too late to get your tickets for Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth, Texas, open tonight and tomorrow night for your ghoulish pleasure!

Walk Like a Zombie

Posted on 28 Oct 2015 In: Haunted House News

From Phoenix to Fayetteville, Zombie Walks continue to entice die-hard living dead/Walking Dead fans into getting out and enjoying some fresh air — and brains, zombie style.

Zombie walks originated in North America shortly after the turn of the century, with the earliest one being hastily assembled at the Gen Con gaming convention in August of 2000. It was actually more of a flash mob with around 60 participants, that was organized to poke fun at Vampire: The Masquerade LARPers who were monopolizing the convention.

As zombie movies became more popular, so did zombie walks, as well as zombie fests and other zombie related events. Let’s face it, this country just loves their zombies!

In downtown Phoenix, the annual Zombie Walk has been luring teeming masses of zombie fans to Heritage & Science Park every fall for six years now. The event has attracted upwards of 20,000 people in recent years, some 15,000 of them in costume.

Starting at sundown, the walk covers a whopping 1.5 miles of downtown Phoenix, serenaded by live bands and lined with food and drink vendors. While 1-1/2 miles might not seem much of a distance for you marathon runners, at a zombie’s pace, well let’s just say you’ve got time for a few beers along the way.

Over in Fayetteville, North Carolina, a similar event takes place every October on the weekend before Halloween. Starting at the Headquarter Library at 7:45 p.m., the zombies parade down Maiden Lane through the streets of downtown Fayetteville to the corner of Hay Street and Ray Avenue, where they can chill and rock out to some cool zombie style live rock music.

In fact, zombie walks are going on all across the country, in Portland, Oregon, Rochester, New York, Fort Collins, Colorado, Orlando, Florida, Rome, Georgia and even in the nation’s capital. In good old New York, New York, aka party town, they’re calling it a “Zombie Crawl.”

If you can’t find a zombie walk in your neighborhood, don’t despair. We’ve got more zombies than you could shake shstick at! Come on down to Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth, Texas and crawl, walk or run through Zombie Central! Open every night through November 1st — get your tickets on line and save some zombie bucks!

Countdown to Halloween: Just 3 days!!!

10 Freaky Facts About Spiders

Posted on 26 Oct 2015 In: Haunted House News

CESpiderWebWhile most people have at least a credible amount of fear or aversion to all forms of creepy crawlies, spiders in particular tend to get a bad rap. Household spiders perform a valuable service by keeping the insect population in check, and while a notorious few can have dangerous bites, the vast majority are perfectly harmless to humans. Spiders are, in large part, nocturnal, and mostly keep to themselves. In other words, if you don’t bother it, it won’t bother you.

Nevertheless, arachnophobia affects some 3-1/2 to 6 percent of the population, and the mere sighting of a spider has been known to make grown men squeal like a little girl. What’s the big deal? Well, could it be because all spiders are predators, and together they make up the largest group of carnivores in the world? Here are ten more freaky facts about spiders:

1. All spiders are venomous, except for one (the hackled orb weaver). They use their venom to paralyze their prey.

2. Spiders transfer venom to their prey by biting them with sharp fangs. In the case of the South American goliath birdeater, those fangs can be over 3/4 of an inch and reach up to 1-1/2 inches!

3. All spiders produce silk, which they use for different purposes. Some use it for shelter, to protect offspring and/or to assist them as they move. Some use it to capture prey, and most use it to keep their victims immobile while they wait for them to liquefy.

4. A spider’s digestive process actually takes place outside the spider’s body. Using its fangs, it injects digestive enzymes into its prey, which cause the tissues inside the exoskeleton to liquefy. It then sucks out the liquefied matter, leaving the insect’s empty shell intact. Some spiders use a slightly different method to break down their prey, but you get the idea.

5. Spiders use a combination of muscle and blood pressure to move their legs. They do this by contracting muscles in their cephalothorax (fused head and thorax), which increases blood pressure to the legs. Jumping spiders can use this sudden increase in blood pressure to spring as much as a foot, horizontally. Yikes!

6. The jumping spider family, or Salticidae, as the eggheads call it, comprises around 13% of all spider species, making it the largest family of spiders. Jumping spiders have exceptional eyesight, owing to their four pairs of eyes. Jumping spiders have no need for webs; they simply pounce on their prey.

7. Like jumping spiders, wolf spiders don’t bother with webs, preferring to hunt down their prey using superior strength and exceptional eyesight, especially at night. Wolf spiders can be found all over the world, are solitary hunters and sometimes mistaken for tarantulas, due to their large size and predilection to remain on the ground, using vegetation or leaf litter for cover. Female wolf spiders are known to be aggressive when they’re carrying around an egg sac, and after hatching, carry the hatchlings around on their backs for several days.

8. Male spiders are generally smaller than female spiders, and risk being eaten by them if the female is hungry enough. For this reason, male spiders of different species are known to perform elaborate courtship rituals to identify themselves as potential mates before approaching a female spider. Jumping spiders perform dances from a safe distance, and then await approval before getting too close. Male orb weavers and other web builders wait on the outer rim of a female’s web, where they gently pluck at the silk to transmit a signal to the female. If she likes the vibes, she’ll send back a signal that it’s safe to approach.

9. The black widow actually comes from a whole family of widow spiders (Theridiidae), so named for their penchant for eating their mates after copulating. The bite of a black widow spider secretes a neurotoxin called latrotoxin, which causes a condition known as latrodectism, both terms deriving from the name of the black widow species: Latrodexus. While rarely fatal in humans, the condition causes pain, vomiting, sweating and muscle rigidity; so you may only wish you were dead. Domestic cats, however, have been known to die from it. Brown recluse, or violin spiders, on the other hand, inject a venom that sometimes leads to necrotizing ulcers that destroy soft tissue, take months to heal and leave deep scars. Rarely, the bites can lead to systemic illness, organ failure and even death in small children or those with a weakened immune system.

10. Arguably the largest species of spider is the South American goliath birdeater, whose leg span can reach up to a foot (about the size of a dinner plate). Found in coastal rainforests of Surinam, French Guiana and Guyana, a few have been spotted occasionally in Brazil and Venezuela. With a reported lifespan of 10 years, the birdeater can weigh more than 6 ounces and has hardened tips and claws on its feet that produce a distinctive clicking sound when it walks. Now THAT’s creepy!

Although some would argue that the giant huntsman is larger since it has a slightly larger leg span, it’s body is much lighter and more delicate. It’s somewhat like comparing a giraffe to an elephant.

In addition to its long fangs, which can reach up to 1-1/2 inches, the birdeater is capable of sending out clouds of hairs from its body which wreak havoc in the eyes and mucous membranes of its enemies. While venomous and quite painful (like driving a nail through your hand), the bite of a birdeater is not deadly to humans.

Contrary to its name, the birdeater doesn’t usually eat birds, although it will attack most anything it encounters and is capable of killing small mammals. Fortunately for the birds, this gargantuan spider mostly hunts for frogs, insects and especially earthworms which come out on humid nights. If a birdeater does happen to stumble on a bird nest, however, it has no qualms about puncturing and drinking bird eggs, and could easily kill chicks and parents as well.

Do creepy crawlies give you the heebie-jeevies? You never know WHAT might leap out of the shadows at Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth, Texas! Come on out and face all of your fears, be they spiders and snakes or creepy clowns with chainsaws! Open every night through November 1st!

Countdown to Halloween: 5 DAYS!

The Corn Maze: An American Tradition

Posted on 24 Oct 2015 In: Haunted House News

Halloween is almost upon us, and all around the nation families are visiting local farms to pick out pumpkins, go on hay rides and navigate through elaborate mazes carved in fields of corn. A relatively new fall tradition, corn mazes have become a popular way for small farmers to supplement their incomes and attract customers to their pumpkin fields.

In fact, the first corn maze was created in 1993, Lebanon Valley College in Annville, Pennsylvania, as a fundraising effort to aid Midwest farmers whose farms had been damaged by severe flooding.

Disney World producer and LVC Alumnus Don Frantz and LVC student Joanne Marx teamed up with Adrian Fisher of Minotaur Designs in England to design a maze, based on the UK’s popular country garden variety. Fisher had designed some 70 mazes including one in the shape of a dragon, but nothing of the size and complexity envisioned by Frantz.

The final creation was open to the public for just two weekends in the fall of 1993, and drew national attention. With an admission of just $5 per person, the college drew nearly 6,000 visitors and raised over $27,000 over the opening weekend alone. All the proceeds went to the Red Cross to aid the stricken farmers.

Since that first effort, corn mazes have become popular tourist attractions in North America, and are created in a variety of artistic shapes and designs. Some are based on a particular theme, or created to tell different stories. Most feature a path which traverses the entire pattern, finishing either in the middle or at the outside, with intermittent false paths leading away from the main trail.

Interestingly, corn mazes have also caught on back in the United Kingdom, where they are known as “maize mazes” since the Brits tend to refer to wheat as “corn.” Especially popular on small family farms in the east of England, these mazes are normally combined with hay rides, petting zoos and picnic areas.

Dixon, California is home to the world’s largest corn maze, as recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records in 2007. Measured at 45 acres in 2010, the attraction has since been unofficially surpassed by Adventure Acres in Bellbrook Ohio, whose 62 acre corn maze features 8.5 miles of trails. Wow — you could be in there a while!

Contrary to popular belief, corn mazes are not simply cut from an existing crop. Corn maze fields are carefully planned, with farmers selecting an appropriate hybrid species to deliver the desired height and stalk strength and spacing the plants for optimal denseness. Also, corn maze fields are generally planted two to three weeks later in the season than crops planted for harvest.

What’s better than a corn maze? A haunted corn maze! As if navigating your way through a complex series of hairpin turns and passageways isn’t scary enough, imagine doing so at night, with ghostly scarecrows, ghouls and monsters lurking around every corner!

Corn Mazes America estimated there were over 800 corn mazes around the country back in 2008. Since many corn mazes are private and not registered anywhere, it’s difficult pinpoint how many are created annually.

Although only a fraction of corn mazes are also haunted, that doesn’t mean they’re not capable of scaring the popcorn out of somebody. In 2011, police in Danvers, Massachusetts (a short distance from Salem) got a 911 call from a family of four who had been lost in a corn maze for several hours. Night had fallen, and the farmer who owned the maze had departed to run some errands and was unable to hear their cries for help.

He returned to his farm a short time later to find squad cars, police and tracking dogs searching for the errant tourists. The family was quickly located just 25 feet from the exit.

Farm owner Bob Connors hadn’t been worried when the family didn’t come right out. “People like to take their time and we don’t like to rush people out of the maze,” Connors said. “We like to give people their money’s worth.”

If you’re into mazes, monsters and scary good times, come on down to Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth, Texas, open every night through November 1st. There’s nothing CORNY about US! (Bring a change of underwear).

Countdown to Halloween: 7 days!

How Much Do You Know About Scarecrows?

Posted on 20 Oct 2015 In: Haunted House News

IMG_3359The Halloween holiday brings with it a slew of iconic images, from Jack o’lanterns, witches and ghosts, to haunted houses, corn mazes, hay rides and scarecrows. Used primarily to discourage crows and other avian pests from devouring corn and wheat before they could be harvested, scarecrows quickly became associated with fall, and make superb Halloween decorations.

It’s easy to see what makes a scarecrow a natural for spooky décor; after all, it is a SCARE crow, and farmers often endeavored to make them as hideous looking as possible.

While scarecrows have been found in ancient Greece and Rome, and even Japan, (the Japanese used rotting meat and fish to make them smell wretched and called them kakashis, meaning something that smells badly) the country that really embraced the scarecrow was Britain. After the population was so reduced by the Great Plague in 1348, farmers could no longer find enough young boys to patrol their wheat fields with bags of stones, and so they resorted to stuffing sacks with straw and carving faces in turnips or gourds. These straw men were then placed on poles in their fields.

So fond are the Brits of their scarecrows, that every year a myriad of festivals crop up, from one end of the United Kingdom to the other. In Meerbrook, Staffordshire, the festival has a storybook theme, featuring animated hay-stuffed Humpty Dumpty’s, Miss Muffets and Little Bo Peeps, among others. Many of these festivals are actually trails, where participants go from display to display, finding clues and solving riddles.

In the U.S., frustrated farmers forsook scarecrows and took to putting a bounty out on crows, and fairly decimated the crow population by the late 1700s. With the crows out of the picture, corn borers and other worms and insects moved in, and were soon doing more damage to the corn and wheat than the crows ever had. So, farmers stopped killing crows and went pack to using scarecrows to keep crop loss to a minimum.

In a small village in modern-day Japan, scarecrows outnumber people. A woman by the name of Tsukimi Ayano started making scarecrows 13 years ago, creating the first one in the likeness of her departed father, as a tribute to him. She has since created more than 350 of them, 150 of which reside in various parts around the town, in homes and businesses of people who have died or moved away. The rest of the straw people have fallen victim to time and the elements.

In fact, the population of the village of Nagoro has dwindled over the years from 150 to just 35 living residents, well outnumbered by the straw people. In the village school, which was closed in 2012 after the last two pupils graduated, scarecrows sit at the desks, and fix their button eyes on a scarecrow teacher standing at the chalkboard. Ooh, that’s too creepy!

ZombieCollegeSpeaking of schools, Thursday is COLLEGE Night at Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth! Show your college student ID and get $8.00 off online tickets or $4.00 off at the door. For online tickets, use the promo code “FBThurs8” — valid for October 22nd only!

Countdown to Halloween: 11 Days!

skeleton2Got a skeleton in your closet? Since the early 1800s, if not earlier, this was a phrase that was meant to imply that you were concealing something of such a serious nature that it might damage your reputation if revealed. In a more sinister connotation, it could refer to past criminal activity, perhaps even the existence of an actual decomposing corpse on the premises.

To this end, skeletons have been turning up unexpectedly in backyards and domiciles for thousands of years. Some have innocent origins and explanations, everything from homes built on ancient burial grounds or forgotten, unmarked graveyards to “Grandma died of a heart attack and we couldn’t afford a cemetery plot.”

On the darker side of the proposition, attics, crawl spaces, walls, chimneys, basements, gardens and backyards have long been favorite hiding places for serial killers or even your seemingly friendly neighbor to stash the bodies of their victims. Often these unfortunate corpses languish for decades or more before being discovered, usually long after the culprit has moved on (or passed on) and some unwitting new homeowner embarks on a remodeling project.

And then, sometimes skeletons are legitimately obtained for some purpose or other and then forgotten about, only to cause hysteria and consternation upon their inadvertent discovery by later generations. Such is the case with a charitable organization dating back to 17th Century England called the Independent Order of the Odd Fellows.

Pledged to “visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead and educate the orphan,” the fraternal order was composed of wealthy society members who wished to aid the lower classes, which was considered “odd” during that period in history, and hence the name.

But it seems their penchant for charity wasn’t the only thing that was odd about the Odd Fellows.

Similar to Freemasons and other secretive societies, the Odd Fellows practiced clandestine rituals involving human bones and skeletons, witnessed only by members of the inner sanctum who were sworn to silence.

The first American Odd Fellows lodge opened in Baltimore in 1819, and after a minor setback during the civil war, the organization flourished. Known as the “Golden Age of Fraternalism” in America, the period of 1860 through 1910/1920 saw the Odd Fellows building lodges in every state, beating out the Freemasons to become the largest of all fraternal organizations according to the 1896 World Almanac.

Although events of the 20th century (depression, wars) led to a serious decline in membership for the Odd Fellows and fraternal organizations in general, membership in the 21st century has begun to rebound. Nonetheless, as the organization evolves and changes, old ways — and old lodges — have fallen by the wayside.

And as those old lodges are closed and sold, skeletons are turning up willy nilly, in places like Warrenton, Virginia, where a contractor found a ritual skeleton in a black wooden box hidden between two walls of the Warrenton Odd Fellows Lodge.

In recent years, the discovery of Odd Fellows skeletons has sparked police investigations in Missouri, Indiana, Pennsylvania and Nebraska. In Oklahoma, the discovery of human remains prompted a work crew to flee in terror.

Owing to the clandestine nature of the society, no one is talking, and therefore no one knows where these skeletons came from or what they were used for.

Famous members of Odd Fellows include Winston Churchill, Charlie Chaplin, Wyatt Earp, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Ulysses S. Grant, Burl Ives and Red Skelton. The first national fraternity to accept both men and women, the society also welcomed into its ranks Eleanor Roosevelt and Dr. Georgia Dwelle, the first woman physician of African American descent.

Here at Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth, Texas, we have more than a few skeletons in our closets, along with evil clowns, zombies and bloodthirsty psychopaths. It’s actually kinda crowded in there. Come on down and take a look — we DARE you! Open Thursday through Sunday nights!

Countdown to Halloween: 18 Days!!!

How Long do Zombies Live? Ask Igor!

Posted on 30 Sep 2015 In: Haunted House News

AskIgorAt Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth, we consider ourselves to be subject matter experts on all things supernatural. From ghosts and goblins to werewolves and wicked witches, we’ve had experience with all kinds of spooky beings and paranormal phenomenon. So we are proud to offer up our resident Master of the Macabre, Igor, to answer your questions on the subject.

Our question for this week was sent in by Silly Sally from Selman City, and she asks, “How long do zombies live?” Take it away, Igor!

Well Sally, that’s kind of a trick question, since zombies aren’t actually alive in the first place. They’re not quite dead, either. What they are is undead, and in that state they tend to stumble around for quite a while, frightening people and eating their brains. So what I’m guessing you really want to know is, how long can a zombie be undead before he becomes just plain old dead?

There are a lot of things that factor into this equation, Sally, including decomposition. While a zombie doesn’t decompose as quickly as someone who’s just plain dead, his flesh does eventually rot away, depending on things like temperature, humidity, and insect activity. Accordingly, a zombie in a tropical region might only last a few weeks, while one in Alaska could keep going for decades.

Then there’s the matter of sustenance. A zombie does not live on bread alone, after all. Actually, zombies don’t eat bread, they eat brains. Consuming the brains of living creatures is what gives a zombie his life force — or death force — or undeath force — whatever. If a zombie can’t find brains to devour, he loses his mojo, and will eventually turn into a door stop. No brains no brawn.

The last thing to consider is the amount of physical damage inflicted on the zombie. A zombie who’s had his head blown off may only stumble around for a few hours, while I’ve personally seen zombies hop around on one leg for weeks at a time. A zombie with missing limbs, however, is usually somewhat compromised in his ability to capture prey, and without a fresh supply of brains, once again, we’re talking doorstop city.

So, I guess the answer to your question then, Sally, is — it depends. And no, we’re not talking about incontinence here. That’s another subject entirely.

Are you off your rocker with supernatural infestations? Got bats in your belfry? Send your quizzical queries to Ask Igor! And be sure to provide a home address, so my friends and I can drop in for a bite!

And if you want to see a whole herd of zombies up close and personal, come on down to Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth — We’ll leave the lights out for you…

Countdown to Halloween: 31 days!

The rare combination of a near-earth super moon and a lunar eclipse, also known as a blood moon was seen roiling the skies above Cutting Edge Haunted House in Fort Worth Sunday night, and is suspected to be a possible cause of some other odd sightings at the world’s longest walk through haunted house.

Although the haunt was closed for the night (open Sunday nights in October), satellite imagery revealed some strange goings on around the grounds of the old converted meat-packing plant. Zombies, vampires and rabid clowns were seen running amok, chasing each other with chain saws across the roof of the building, swinging from the parapets and baying at the moon. One blurry photo appears to reveal a zombie wearing what could only be a pair of ladies panties on his head.

While eminently disturbing, this kind of phenomenon is not unheard of during a lunar eclipse, when it is said that animals’ internal clocks get out of whack and creatures on the fringes of humanity seem to drift even further from their human roots. Accordingly, a great number of myths and superstitions have sprung up through the years around both solar and lunar eclipses.

During the Middle Ages, it was believed that children conceived during a lunar eclipse would be born with demons inside them. A somewhat more recent superstition holds that if a pregnant woman touches her belly during a lunar eclipse, the baby will be born with a birth mark on the area that was touched.

In India, some believe that if you sleep with wet hair during a lunar eclipse, you will awake stark raving mad, while others believe that you should bathe before and after the event, to wash away evil spirits — and also wash your eyes out with urine to keep them from hurting… To KEEP them from hurting?!

Some Eskimos turn their utensils upside down during an eclipse to keep the “sick” sun and moon from shining poisoned rays onto them, bringing on disease and famine. In Thailand, many citizens still bang on pots and light off fireworks during an eclipse to scare away the evil spirits that have devoured the sun or the moon.

It is said that Christopher Columbus used his foreknowledge of an upcoming lunar eclipse to trick hostile native chiefs into giving him food by threatening to darken the moon unless they did his bidding. After initially refusing, the chiefs caved when the moon went dark, seemingly on cue, at the intrepid explorer’s spoken command.

And so, if things got a little weird Sunday night, or if you work for NASA and you happened to capture some very bizarre satellite images, just chalk it up to the blood moon. Not to worry; there won’t be another one until 2033!

Cutting Edge Haunted House, however, is open every Friday and Saturday night in September, plus Sundays and selected weekdays in October. So if you REALLY want to see some super scary supernatural beings just being themselves — come on down!

Countdown to Halloween: 34 days!!!

Coming to a Night Sky Near You…

Posted on 24 Sep 2015 In: Haunted House News


A rare, super moon/lunar eclipse combo is set to occur late Sunday evening, September 27th. If you miss this one, you won’t see another until 2033!

Seasoned celestial observers and whuffos alike (“whuffo you looking up at the sky?) will be craning their necks late Sunday evening to get a peek at a rare giant blood moon. Starting around 8 p.m. in the United States, the earth, moon and sun will begin to align, and as the moon passes through the shadow of the earth, the darkened moon will appear to have turned a deep reddish color, hence the moniker, “blood moon.”

Don’t have a telescope? Don’t need one! This particular lunar eclipse coincides with a “super moon,” when the moon happens to be at the closest point in its orbit of the earth, causing it to appear around 30% brighter and 14% larger than the norm. Unlike a solar eclipse, no special viewing equipment is required to observe the lunar variety, although binoculars or a telescope can certainly enhance the experience.

The eclipse is expected to reach its peak during the 10 o’clock hour, for those who just want to step outside and take a brief gander. The whole thing should be over shortly after midnight.

It’s great opportunity to host a viewing party. It’s likely a bad time to be out and about, however. After all, if a plain old full moon can trigger all kinds of strange behavior, we shudder to think what frightening occurrences might be brought on by a super blood moon! Stay safe out there!

Get psyched up for the blood moon by visiting Cutting Edge Haunted House this weekend, open Friday and Saturday nights! Do it for the kids —

Because Cutting Edge believes Halloween is about the Child in all of us, this weekend a portion of every ticket sold will benefit the Cook Children’s Hospital of Fort Worth!

Countdown to Halloween: 37 days!

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